Black women become educated and live longer, Black men get educated and still die younger?

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Williams, who is Black, first became a professor at Yale University, he wore a coat and tie every day. No one else in his department did that. And yet, he says, he kept up the practice for years. LaVeist remembers getting onto an elevator at an academic medical center around 1990, shortly after earning his Ph.D., and a passenger wearing a white coat — presumably a doctor — asked LaVeist, who was dressed in a suit, to clean up a spill on the sixth floor. "When I told him that I was a professor, he didn't speak," says LaVeist. "He simply didn't speak." How The Pandemic Is Widening The Racial Wealth Gap SHOTS - HEALTH NEWS How The Pandemic Is Widening The Racial Wealth Gap Greg Pennington has a doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of North Carolina and an undergraduate degree from Harvard, owns a professional consulting firm in Atlanta, and has worked with hundreds of men individually as well as dozens of Fortune 500 companies. "It's not so much that [Black men] experience discrimination and depression 'even after' they have advanced degrees," he says. "It's more descriptive to say 'throughout the whole process.'" Despite their academic credentials, Black men say, they often feel they need to prove themselves, which adds another layer of stress. "It's almost like I can't fail; I'm representative of other Black males," says Woodrow W. Winchester III, director of professional engineering programs at the University of Maryland-Baltimore County. "Your value and your success are around advancing the collective."